Output shifts

Despite two decades of outsourcing and globalisation, the US remains the world’s largest manufacturer in 2009. However, its share of world value-added in manufacturing declined from around 22.7% of the total in 1990 to less than 20% in 2009. China’s share rose from a minute 2.7% to 17.5% over the same period, taking over Japan, hitherto the world’s second largest manufacture, whose share dropped from 17.7% to 11.4% over the two decades.

China’s increase was a fillip to the share of emerging markets in general,  with BRIIC countries (which as well as China include Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia and South Africa) accounting for a quarter of value-added in manufacturing in 2009 compared with less than 10% in 1990.

This is in contrast with the fall in the share of several other OECD countries has also fallen, notably in Germany by three percentage points to just over 6% of the total. The EU now accounts for only 17.5%. Two OECD countries that saw slight increases include Australia, whose share edged up to 1% of the total, as it gained from the Asian boom, and Mexico, whose share reached 1.8%, up from 1.3%, reflected this economy’s emerging status.

See www.oecd.org/enterprise and “Manufacturing Ideas”, OECD Observer No 261, May 2007

©OECD Observer No 286 Q3 2011




Economic data

E-Newsletter

Stay up-to-date with the latest news from the OECD by signing up for our e-newsletter :

Twitter feed

Editor's choice

  • Internet policy video
  • As the Internet transforms the way people, businesses, and economies work, what policies do governments need to implement so that everyone benefits from the digital economy?
  • "About 53% of foreign bribery cases involved corporate management or CEOs." Read more in the OECD Foreign Bribery Report
  • France 24 – Eurozone weakness threatens global economy: The Eurozone could get stuck in a “stagnation trap" without decisive action and poses a risk to the entire global economy.
  • [Video] If Africa aided Norway: Radi-aid challenges clichés.
  • [VIDEO] Migration is constantly evolving. Around one in ten people in the developed world today is an immigrant. And over the past decade, migrants have accounted for 70% of the increase in the working-age population in the OECD area, according to the OECD’s latest International Migration Outlook.
  • More fiscal stimulus could help Japan: speaking with CNBC, Randall Jones, Head of Japan/Korea Desk at OECD, warns that Japan needs a detailed and credible fiscal consolidation plan.
  • Modest global economic forecasts, continuing high unemployment and serious downside risks should spur governments with a greater sense of urgency to fully employ monetary, fiscal and structural policy levers to support growth, notably in Europe, according to the OECD’s latest Economic Outlook.
  • OECD Employment Outlook 2014: The OECD Employment Outlook 2014 includes chapters on recent labour market developments with a special section on earnings, job quality, youth employment, and forms of employment and employment protection.
  • Try our latest OECD Observer crossword!
  • Better Life Index
    How do you measure a Better Life? The OECD has launched a new interactive infographic where visitors can explore the priorities of people worldwide. Be a part of it. Create and share your Better Life Index.

Most Popular Articles

Subscribe Now

<b>Subscribe now!</b>

To receive your exclusive print editions delivered to you directly


Online edition
Previous editions

Poll

Is deflation a major risk in OECD economies?

Yes
No
Don't know

OECD Insights Blog

NOTE: All signed articles in the OECD Observer express the opinions of the authors
and do not necessarily represent the official views of OECD member countries.

All rights reserved. OECD 2014